2006/08/15

Photo Fraud in Lebanon

The Israelis wreaked plenty of real damage on Lebanon, so there should be no need to exaggerate. But, yes, there has been exaggeration in at least some of the photojournalism. I suspect that such "photo fraud" is career- rather than politically-motivated. That is, the photographer just wants to get (or to fabricate) the most dramatic shot possible to call attention to his (her?) work and self. Whatever the motives, we should be aware that it's going on. Check out Photo Fraud in Lebanon.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

You are presenting news to your readers that there was photo fraud in showing what had happened in Lebanon--and that this had been carried out by more than one news agency and type of media.
Yet you immediately try to mitigate this by saying :"That is, the photographer just wants to get (or to fabricate) the most dramatic shot possible to call attention to his (her?) work and self.".

For goodness sakes, Geoff--there was photo fraud here--why did the fact that it was done for the other side cause you to try to excuse it before you introduced the readers to it?

If you are going to present information..then present it and let your readers make up their own minds..at least that's what sprang to mind as I read this particular item.

Thanks.

sabaii said...

I agree. I listened to the video that you directed us to, and many serious points were made.

If you wanted readers of your blog to pay attention to the video in the first place, why try to lessen its impact with your own comments before we go to the site?

If reality is being distorted, it doesn't matter which "side" is perpetrating it, no?

gef said...

OK. Let's not excuse the photographer. I don't know the motives for the frauds, whether political or careerist. Probably both.